Quotes by Sherlock Holmes –Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

When you have eliminated the impossible,whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
“The Sign of Four”

Improbable as it is, all other explanations are more improbable still.
“Silver Blaze”

It is impossible as I state it,and therefore I must in some respect have stated it wrong.
“The Adventure of The Priory School”

You see, but you do not observe.
“A Scandal in Bohemia”

One should always look for a possible alternative and provide against it. It is the first rule of criminal investigation.
“The Black Peter”

I never guess. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.
“A Scandal in Bohemia”

There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.
“The Boscombe Valley Mystery”

Circumstantial evidence is a very tricky thing. It may seem to point very straight to one thing, but if you shift your own point of view a little, you may find it pointing in an equally uncompromising manner to something entirely different.
“The Boscombe Valley Mystery”

It is a mistake to confound strangeness with mystery. The most commonplace crime is often the most mysterious, because it presents no new or special features from which deductions may be drawn.
“A Study in Scarlet”

Where there is no imagination, there is no horror.
“A Study in Scarlet”

In solving a problem of this sort, the grand thing is to be able to reason backwards.
That is a very useful accomplishment, and a very easy one, but people do not practice it much. In the everyday affairs of life it is more useful to reason forward,
and so the other comes to be neglected. There are fifty who can reason synthetically for one who can reason analytically.
“A Study in Scarlet”

When a fact appears to be opposed to a long train of deductions, it invariably proves to be capable of bearing some other interpretation.
“A Study in Scarlet”

I never make an exception. An exception disproves the rule.
“The Sign of Four”

Winwood Reade is good upon the subject. He remarks that, while the individual man is an insoluble puzzle, in the aggregate he becomes a mathematical certainty.
You can, for example, never foretell what any one man will do, but you can say with precision what an average number will be up to. Individuals vary, but percentages remain constant. So says the statistician.
“The Sign of Four”

Crime is common. Logic is rare. Therefore, it is upon the logic rather than upon the crime that you should dwell.
“The Adventure of the Copper Beeches”

I should prefer that you do not mention my name at all in connection with the case, as I choose to be only associated with those crimes which present some difficulty in their solution.
“The Adventure of the Cardboard Box”

We approached the case, you remember, with an absolutely blank mind, which is always an advantage. We had formed no theories. We were simply there to observe and to draw inferences from our observations.
“The Adventure of the Cardboard Box”

The most difficult crime to track is the one which is purposeless.
“The Naval Treaty”

One true inference invariably suggests others.
“Silver Blaze”

Any truth is better than indefinite doubt.
“The Yellow Face”

The more bizarre a thing is, the less mysterious it proves to be. It is your commonplace, featureless crimes which are really puzzling, just as a commonplace face is the most difficult to identify.
“Red-Headed League”

The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.
“The Hound of the Baskervilles”

We balance probabilities and choose the most likely. It is the scientific use of the imagination.
“The Hound of the Baskervilles”

Depend upon it, there is nothing so unnatural as the commonplace.
“A Case of Identity”

It is my business to know things. Perhaps, I have trained myself to see what others overlook.
“A Case of Identity”